Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Tuesday, April 21, 2009


Heidi Kontaken who is recently back from the Valley of the Kings has very kindly sent me some photos. I'll work my way through them and post up anything interesting. I'm hoping for photos from a couple of other people as well.

This one shows the cave by KV63. I've downsized the resolution to fit the blog - if somebody spots something that needs blowing up, then please post a comment.

11 comments:

tim said...

Hi Kate

This is a fine image of the cave however I would like to know how much of the right side of the cave remains unseen.

http://tim-theegyptians.blogspot.com/

Anonymous said...

Actualy not much, its a rather small area inside.

Hans

Dennis said...

Is there room enough to place an embalming bed with associated furniture?

Anonymous said...

In my opinnion no, what I looked at it it was small and kind of crampy.

Hans

Anonymous said...

How did the belief occur that embalming took place in the VOK? There are pictorial reliefs from tombs or coffins that show the coffin and mummy and fixtures being dragged to the tombs in a grand procession, I assume the coffined mummy was prepared far enough away to facilitate such a grand procession. Does anyone agree or disagee?

tim said...

Hello Anonymous

I am in agreement with the idea that the embalming did not happen in the valley but more that likely in an embalming tent nearer to the Nile. With the funerary ceremonies beginning in the morning with the crossing of the Nile to the west bank and on to the tomb.

A number of small wooden models of funerary boats have been found showing the mummy laying on a funerary bed on board.

http://tim-theegyptians.blogspot.com/

Anonymous said...

I seem to recollect that Theodore Davis found a pit (which he believed to be Tuts actual tomb)containing embalming materials, natron bandages, etc and the remains of the funerary feast of Tut. If the embalming/mummification was done outside the VOK why would they drag the stuff all the way into the valley to bury it in a pit. Isnt it more likely that the process took place in the valley?

Kate Phizackerley said...

Indeed, KV54 contains the refuse from Tutankhamun's burial feast and bags of natron. The belief is these items were removed from KV62 when KV62 was filled with chippings after the first robbery. Whether it is possible to tell whether natron has been used for a burial, I wouldn't know.

Dennis said...

It was my understanding that embalming was a profession and as such there would have been embalming areas. I do not know but suspect that the body would have been embalmed in a hot, dry, fairly open area. The smell was probably not bad - no rot. I would see no problem with embalming in one area and then hauling the body to the church for the funeral. Apparently the used natron from royals was stashed away somewhere to prevent its reuse.

tim said...

Hi Kate and Hello Dennis

I have my doubts that beside the royal family that any other class of society would ever be brought to a temple after death (though I could be wrong)and in the case of the royal family only the mortuary temple and associated valley temples of the old kingdom. I am in agreement that the used natron and material would have contained the essence of the spirit used upon and buried for those reasons.

http://tim-theegyptians.blogspot.com/

Anonymous said...

The embalming of the pharaohs did not have to be at Thebes. Evidence found by the French when treating the body of Ramses II in Paris suggested he was embalmed in the Delta. There have been other finds of jars with embalming refuse, for example Carter-carnarvon found jars close to the tomb of Merneptah. It is possible such material, having touched a "god" would be held as sacred and could not just be thrown away: this might account for the material in KV63.

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