Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Wednesday, November 17, 2010

http://www.drhawass.com/photoblog/close-new-statue-unearthed-luxor

Dr Hasass has posted a close up of the latest statue which is much clearer.

Sent from my Windows Phone

14 comments:

tim said...

Hi Kate

Very creepy looking King!

Marianne Luban said...

It looks wonderful to me--but strange. The darker parts appear almost like reconstructions of missing parts of the red stone, but the site of Hawass doesn't indicate that.

rymerster said...

It doesn't look like Amenhotep III to me.

Stephanie said...

Is this statue inscribed with his name or is it assigned to Amenhotep III only on stylistic grounds or due to the location it was found in?

Anonymous said...

VEINS ARE COMMON IN GRANITE INTRUSIONS, ESPECIALLY NEAR TO THE EDGES OF THE INTRUDED MATERIAL.

Anonymous said...

There is the upper part of a statue in the British Museum of Ramesses II. The body is in grano-diorite while the head is in a different igneous rock. T.G.H. James suggests this difference in the rock was masked by paint.

John Bright said...

There was another dyad of the same pairing unearthed earlier but the faces had been badly damaged. It was hard to tell from the published photograph if this damage was deliberate or the result of natural processes in the soil.
Speaking of statues which have these geological traits, there are two I know of in The Cairo Museum. CG824 is thought to be from somewhere in the Theban area and has been identified by some as Ramesses II.
JE37930, of unknown provenance, seems to have part of the lower face carved from a darker material than the red granite that makes up the remainder. This has been tentatively identified as Ay, though I understand there is an alternative proposal that it is an older woman rather than an older man.

John Bright said...

All these finds seem to raise questions over earlier exploration at the site. It was for so long dismissed as unworthwhile to excavate it. Likewise the temple of Merneptah was thought to have been thoroughly excavated by Petrie but further work revealed much he had missed and transformed the site into one worth visiting. Does this mean it is worth redigging sites such as the mortuary temples of Tausert or Siptah to name just two that spring to mind?

Anonymous said...

Has anyone wondered what became of all the walls, ceilings, floors and pylons of this Amunhotep III temple? Merenptah did not use all that stone for his.

Stuart Tyler said...

@ Anonymous. The walls were mainly mud brick and so were badly affected by the annual inundation. the temple was built on a floodplain (possibly deliberately) and thus was affected each and every year by the inundation.

Also as you say, Merenptah amongst others helped themselves to the now decaying temple- taking statues and i believe architectural elements also.

Stuart

Marianne Luban said...

Even the famous "Israel Stela" of Merneptah was reused from Amenhotep III, the new text incised on the verso of the stone. It was discovered by Flinders Petrie in 1896.

John Bright said...

I recall reading that Merneptah demolished a structure dedicated to Sokar that was a separate building within the Amenhotep temenos. It was located near to the site of his mortuary temple. There are stones visible in the pylon of the Khonsu temple at Karnak that bear the cartouche of Amenhotep. While the outer parts of Amenhotep's temple may have been mud brick, the columned hall and beyond would have had stone walls, floor and ceilings. The floors and stubs of some of the columns are still in place. There are Late Period shrines at Karnak that use 18th Dynasty columns, clearly re-used from somewhere. Whether they, and similar columns at Medinet Habu were moved from Amenhotep III's by then defunct mortuary temple is worth investigating. I suspect that if the First Pylon at Karnak was dismantled like the Ninth Pylon, then a "treasure trove" of older buildings might be found re-used as filling. There is also the paved way that was laid between the sphinxes of Nectanebo. This is another area worthy of investigation for re-used material. To answer anonymous, this might be where the stones from many of the West Bank temples were used.

John Bright said...

A third statue pair has been unearthed at the Mortuary Temple site. This shows Amenhotep III with Amen. In the press release there is talk of a possible cache of statues. The SCA is also attempting to buy more land from a local farmer so it can extend the excavated area.

John Bright said...

I've been away for a week in the snows of Scotland. On my return I had a notification of two more staues that have been unearthed at this site. They do not seem to be as well preserved as some of the previous discoveries. There is more information on Doctor Hawass's site.
While in the UK, I stopped off in London to visit the B.M.. There are several staues and large fragments from Amenhotep's mortuary temple on display here that were brought back to Britain by Belzoni: one even has his "signature" on its base.

Search

Admin Control Panel