Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Thursday, October 28, 2010

I checked the KV-63 site and didn't spot the upgrade but fortunately eagle-eyed Dennis did!  Some lectures have been announced, both in California:

2010 Lectures
November 7 at 2:30 P.M.
Dr. Otto Schaden
Update on KV 63: The Newest Tomb in the Valley of the KingsHosted by The American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter
arce.org/chapters/northerncalifornia/home

November 6 at 1:30 P.M.
Dr. Otto Schaden
Update on KV 63: The Newest Tomb in the Valley of the KingsHosted by The American Research Center in Egypt, Orange County Chapter(Southern California)
arceoc.org

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Sunday, October 24, 2010

The Nefertiti bust has been in the blogs again with Andie Byrnes reporting that 1.2 million people viewed it last year.  So we know what Nefertiti looked like.

Or do we?  I mentioned the papers written in memorial to Bill Murnane some time ago, but I am still working through them.  I recommend the paper by Earl L Ertman on the Images of Amenhotep IV and Nefertiti in the Style of the Previous Reign [Amenhotep III].  Relatively few images of Nefertiti have been identified from the reign of Amenhotep III (or perhaps more precisely, few images showing pre-Amarnan styling), but Ertman still charts changes in the representation of Nefertiti.  The changes in the representation of Akhenaten are well known, but less has been written on the changes in the representation of Queen Nefertiti.  Comparing the images in the paper with the famous bust, there are clear differences for example in the shape of the eyes.  While it is tempting to assume that the bust is a photographic representation of Nefertiti, there are grounds for feeling that Amarna era images are more stylised that faithful portraits.

The portrayal of royalty is often not accurate.  Even portaits of HM Queen Elizabeth are remarkably varied and, in candour, some do not especially look like her Majesty.  In Medieval England portraits of English queens often depicted them with blonde hair because that we the popular feminine ideal, even though they are now known to have had dark hair (for instance some Spanish princesses).

There is no doubt that the bust is a wonderful piece of art, but it may still be an idealised representation.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Sunday, October 24, 2010

Another minor report on Egyptologia.  It is looking as though we may get a dig diary.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Sunday, October 24, 2010

As we know, Horemheb was burried in tomb KV57 in the Valley of the Kings but before he became Pharaoh, he built a tomb at Saqqara which is less well publicised.  Jane Akhar has posted up some photos.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Sunday, October 24, 2010

Just a reminder that Stuart Tyler is still working on his Hatshepsut blog.  I particularly like the photo of a statute he has found although sadly he doesn't give any details about the statue or where it was found.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Thursday, October 14, 2010

I've just ploughed through a pile of news reports about Egypt and found nothing of interest.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Monday, October 11, 2010

There is a new Amarna book out written by Sue Moseley called "Amarna the Missing Evidence".  I've not read it.  It sounded interesting until I read reviews on Amazon, such as:


This book says "missing evidence", and evidence certainly is missing. The sources/bibliography list is rather short, and some of the sources rather old. Especially, Ms Moseley omits any reference to the 2005 CT/MRI scan of King Tut (which was in "National Geographic"), or the discovery of KV63.



I would like to see a book by someone who has dispassionately gone over all the fragmented information about Akhenaten/Nefertiti/Amarna and arrived at conclusions. This book isn't that.
Those reviews have put me off.  My guess is that this is a book which might suit somebody who knows nothing about Amarna but wouldn't suit me so I won't be buying a copy, but if anybody has read it and thinks I should buy it then I would welcome somebody posting up a comment.

I'm beginning to think that I need to write the book I want myself!

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Friday, October 08, 2010

Blain Hunt posted a comment to say he found the Scota video hard to view. My apologies.

I chose that medium when I found the video because I didn't wish to overplay the story. If you are finding the video hard, Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scota) is a bit dry but gives the bare bones. If you'd like to know more than that then the Kingdom of the Ark by Lorraine Evans is an accessible book. I don't agree with all of her conclusions but she looks at things like the Ferriby Boats when discussing the feasibility of sea travel from Egypt to Ireland which is interesting reading of itself. I picked up my copy on Amazon for a penny plus P&P.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Friday, October 08, 2010

While news is slack, I thought I would present a myth - as a myth not fact - which will be familar to some readers and new to others.  In this myth an Egyptian princess called Scota left her homeland and travelled to Ireland.  Scota is often identified as Meritaten as this video reveals.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Friday, October 08, 2010

I have been meaining to review this book for ages.  Somebody was asking me about Ankhesenamun earlier in the week and I recommended this book for anybody seriously interested in the Amarna Queens and Princesses.  I didn't have a review I could offer so I have put that right and published one.  For now it is on Squidoo but I may add one on the new site when it is ready.

The Royal Women of Amarna is nearly 15 years old but it is still a fantastic book.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Saturday, October 02, 2010

Since there is a PD handout picture, I thought I would pop it up here.


Obviously, this only shows one side. (See the earlier post.)  There is also a great photo which clearly shows that there are further parts of this statue in the ground, or parts of other statues.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Saturday, October 02, 2010

A new statue of Amenhotep III has been found at Kom El-Hittan, best known as the site of the Colossi of Memnon.  There is a picture on the Dr Hawass site.  It doesn't say, but it looks as though the statue has been carved in granite.  One side is very badly damaged but the righthand figure looks to be particularly fine.  Work is continuing to find the rest of the statue.


While a lot of focus has been lavished on the Valley of the Kings, the exacavation of Amenhotep's Mortuary temple has been a brilliant excavation.

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