Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Monday, December 27, 2010

http://luxortimesmagazine.blogspot.com/2010/12/cache-of-demotic-ostraca-found-in.html

150 ostraca have been found at the Ptolemaic / Roman period temple.  The link has everything I've managed to find. So far there are no pictures.

Sent from my Windows Phone

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Sunday, December 26, 2010

http://mobile.nytimes.com/article?a=720018

In case anybody has friends or relatives in Egypt, I thought I'd post this up. The coach as taking tourists from Aswan to Abu Simbel.  I've no more news.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Sunday, December 26, 2010

http://www.google.com/gwt/x?source=reader&u=http%3A%2F%2Ffeedproxy.google.com%2F%7Er%2FDrhawasscom-New%2F%7E3%2FMlPZR8iCs9c%2Fimprovements-sca-employees

Both from a social care perspective, and wishing a well-motivated workforce caring for the monuments, Dr Hawass' announcement of improved medical coverage for SCA staff seems like good news.  (My only hesitation is the the devil can be in the detail and medical plans are only valuable if they pay out.  There also are far fewer women in the SCA than we'd expect in an equal society - I just hope the medical plan covers pregnancy and infant care.)

Sent from my Windows Phone

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Thursday, December 23, 2010

http://mobile.nytimes.com/article?a=718815&f=38

I promised a broader spread of news while Andie is away and found this rather gentle account of the realities of living on a houseboat on the Nile.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Thursday, December 23, 2010

This is a story for the techno-geeks.  A team of scientists have been analysing Egyptian mining slag from 3,000 years ago (in what today is Israel).  They have revealed very fast fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field and that it reached more than twice the expected strength.  It's believed it was a localised effect.

I don't believe the Egyptians would have been aware of the effects.


http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/12/magnetic-copper-slag/

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Thursday, December 23, 2010

Tracings made by Norman de Garis Davies in Theban tombs TT 76, TT 85, TT 95, TT 108, TT 161, TT 176, TT 179, TT 200, TT 222, TT 249 and TT 260 have been made avilable online by the Griffiths Institute who continue to lead the way in publication of Egyptian sites.  It seems to me that they have the right model.  Free access for casual use and academic study (including "amateur" Egyptologists), but charge for those wishing to publish the material. 

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Thursday, December 23, 2010

The transcipts of Howard Carter's journals have been online for a few weeks.  In the past few days, scans of the journals themselves are now online as well on the Griffiths Institute site.  (Follow the second link then browse to the journals.)

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Wednesday, December 22, 2010

The Griffiths Institute has discounted books of unprovenanced statues and OsirisNet has announced on Jane's blog an update and pictures from tomb TT52 which you can find here.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Wednesday, December 22, 2010

http://luxor-news.blogspot.com/2010/12/kv8-merenptah-photos-from-richard.html

A Christmas present from Richard Sellicks with photos of the recently reopened KV8 on Jane's blog.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Wednesday, December 22, 2010

http://articles.cnn.com/2010-12-17/world/old.babylonian.math_1_ancient-world-ancient-city-nippur?_s=PM:WORLD

Not Egypt but I'm interested in the knowledge of geometry in the ancient world - definitely relevant to pyramid building.  (This isn't becoming maths blog - just chance there have been two recent articles.)


Sent from my Windows Phone

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Tuesday, December 21, 2010

http://www.bridgewater-hall.co.uk/

Zahi Hawass is going to be lecturing at the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester, England on 4th February.  Tickets via the link above: more details on the Dr Hawass blog.

He promises to speak about Tutankhamun. We can guess that is his death from malaria theory and maybe a bit of DNA.  As genetics is quite complex, I doubt the DNA stuff will be detailed. 

He is also down to speak about the hunt for the tomb of Nefertiti.  If that's more than marketing hyperbole, that could be interesting.  I do think Nefertiti's tomb remains to be found; I am intrigued though why Hawass is confident she wasn't buried with Akhenaten.  I still believe they will be found together in the same tomb.

Finally he promises an update on the Valley of the Kings.  If that's last winter's excavations it will be interesting, but it could be very, very much more if he speaks about work in the Western Valley of the Kings. It is also believed a sarcophagus was removed last winter from one of the previously uncleared tombs.  That has never been officially confirmed, nor has there been any rumours on the identity of the individual.  As I broke on this blog a few weeks ago, there is an excavation team back at work in the Valley of the Kings.  Of course, we all hope for a definitive update on tomb KV64.

If you live in or near Manchester this seems like a must see event.

(Edited now I am on the laptop to tidy the title and add a link to the article on the Hawass site)

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Monday, December 20, 2010

While Andie is away, I'll post up any general stuff I come across.  Here is a video about how Egyptians handled multiplication and division. 



The methods I was taught in school was the hardest. I now know several easier ways - but this is one of the easiest of all!

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Sunday, December 19, 2010

Merry Christmas everyone.

I'll be around throughout so I'll post up any breaking stories.  I probably won't get on a laptop too often, so coverage is likely to be pithy - Smartphones are wonderful (though I hate this new Windows Phone - I should have bought an IPhone) .

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Saturday, December 18, 2010

Canopic Jar of Kiya (?)

The canopic jars in KV55 are important as they were orginally dedicated to Kiya and form part of the evidence that at least some funerary goods were relocated back from Amarna to the Valley of the Kings. This photo by Doris Pemler of the one in the Met is one of the finest shots I have ever seen. For anybody looking for photos for websites, it is also available under a Creative Commons licence - details if you follow the link through to Flickr. Of course we don't know whose organs are in the jars ... If you are interested in how the canopic jars from KV55 have been attributed, this paper by Cyril Aldred is worth reading.  In it he discussed how hair style has been used to identify the likely personages represented in various Amarnan objects.  (PS the identification with Kiya is disputed with some people suggesting they show Meritaten.)

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Friday, December 17, 2010

This is something that came up recently on EEF with somebody linking to material I hadn't seen before which suggests that Maia, Tutankhamun's wet nurse, was in fact Meritaten.  I haven't read the paper but personally I am sceptical.  It is pretty clear that Meritaten was a Queen and probably married to both Akhenaten and Smenkhare / Smenkhkare. There is no mention of this title in Maia's tomb which seems to reduce the changes that she was Meritaten. The video below gives an introduction to Maia's tomb.



You might also me interested in this article on Tia the wet nurse of Ankhesenpaaten (Ankhesenamun).

(Thanks to Andie Byrnes and Raymon Betz).

PS I've created a Squidoo lens about Tia.  It's very brief and has nothing that isn't in this article so I don't recommend it!  It does offer me a steady bookmark though which is why I created it.   I'll add a longer one about Maia in the next few days.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Friday, December 17, 2010

The latest finds are in very poor condition, but add to the tally of statues found at Amenhotep III's Mortuary Temple.  You can read about them on Dr Hawass site or on Fox News..

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Monday, December 13, 2010

Old back and white photos and videos seem to be a furm favourite with many readers so here is one I hadn't seen before - a 1920s video of Nefertari's Tomb in the Valley of the Queens.  It is a "silent" movie with cut card captions rather than any commentary.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Saturday, December 11, 2010

Francesco Tiradritti has a dig diary for their 2010 winter season at the tomb of Harwa.  There is no newsfeed so you will need to click through the calendar to read each day in turn.  I have linked to a translation into English from the original Italian.

Harwa's tomb is in Assasif area and known as TT37.  It is a 25th Dynasty tomb built on the processional way of Mentuhotep with an entrance from the south.  Although little known, it is very large for a private tomb with four underground levels and reaches depths of 25m.  The best sites explaining the tomb I have found are here and here. Jane Akshar also covered a Mummification Museum lecture in 2009 which has more details.  The video below is from 2009 as well - but it is in Italian



Harwa's mummy is in the Field Museum in Chicago. There is an (English!) video about it, although the video has a lot of general shots of places like Karnak but persist and you will get shots of the mummy and his cedar coffin later.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Friday, December 10, 2010

I haven't done much on this site because it was a bit slower than I liked.  I am in the process of migrating it to the same servers used for Egyptological Online which Andie and I are developing together.  They are *much* faster.  The downside is that the site is down during the move.  It should be back online after the weekend unless I hit a sang (and at present I fear I may have done)!

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Friday, December 10, 2010

http://egyptology.blogspot.com/2010/12/tv-notes-silver-pharaoh-mystery.html

Andie has written up this fantastic review if the Psusennes documentary for anyone who missed it.  It tells the story almost as fully as the documentary itself.  21st Dynasty Egypt is fascinating.  The wealth of Psusennes I who ruled only Lower Egypt suggests how wealthy Karnak must have been at the time.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Thursday, December 09, 2010

Really interesting looking documentary on Five about Psusennes I.  Sorry for the short notice!

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Tuesday, December 07, 2010

More wonderful photos from Richard Sellicks, this time of tomb KV11 in the Valley of the Kings.  You can find them on Jane's blog.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Tuesday, December 07, 2010

Thanks to Andie at Egyptology News for finding this article - and a new feed for my newsreader.  This season they are going to be excavating 'Cemetry C', a post-New Kingdom cemetry.  This though is just a heads up - work won't start for another 5 weeks.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Monday, December 06, 2010

http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=380804&CategoryId=14094

So I know this isn't Egypt but such an early date for mining even on another continent is important as it suggests 'civilisation' got going earlier than is often supposed.  I'd like to see some confirmation though.  If I understand it correctly it is also not being associated with metal working.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Thursday, December 02, 2010

For those who like photos. this set by David Rae is worth a look.  He has some very clear images.  (Sorry no excavations or anything like that.)

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Thursday, December 02, 2010

I recently posted about apparently new excavations in the Valley of the Kings and people have been discussing in comments the likely location.  Richard Sellicks has contacted me with an image from his collection which shows some of the landmarks in the excavation photo.  Richards images proves this is the Valley of the Kings.  (I have self-hosted this so click through to the maximum resolution.)



Many thanks to Richard.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Thursday, December 02, 2010

I'd missed it but fortunately Len Solt has spotted a large article by Dr Otto Schaden on the KV63 site.  It desrives thw sorts of tasks the team plan for the next couple of seasons in both KV63 and KV10.  Both are contingent on managing to raise funds - far from easy in the current evironment.

Otto should be back in the Valley of the Kings early in the New Year and promises a further update in late Decmember.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Wednesday, December 01, 2010

http://toniccorpuspress.free.fr/index.html

I don't often promote books for authors but Tonic sent me the link and I thought I'd mention it because it won't make American or British listings because it is written in French. Sorry but I have no more details.

I expect to log on tomorrow and catch up on some other posts.

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