Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Wednesday, April 06, 2011

Patrick Philpott has kindly summarised the Amarna updates the latest Journal of Egyptian Archaeology (in case you don't take it) pp. 1-31 "Tell El-Amarna 2010", Barry Kemp et al.....


1) Faience scarab inscribed with 'Neb-Maat-Re' ( = Amenhotep III, proving yet again the strong spiritual - probably not physical - presence of Akhenaten's father at the new city)
2) A mummy case with garbled inscriptions, further proof that those who wrote the texts did not always know what they were doing - a sobering thought
3) a nice stela with three very Amarnesque figures, text undecipherable
4) from the many burials studied, more evidence of malnutrition, work-related injuries and early deaths among the working classes: no, it was not Xanadu!
pp. 191-205, "New Light on the Amarna Period", Hoffmeier and Van Djik - excavations at Tell el-Borg in nortern Sinai -
  • 1) evidence of strong military presence during the Amarna period
  • 2) series of seals and scarabs from Queen Tiye through to Horemheb, including Tutankhamun, Ankhkheperure Mery-Waen-Re ( = probably Smenkhkare) and one of 'Neferneferuaten Akhet-en-Hys ( = useful to her husband), a title unearthed some time ago by Marc Gabolde, and proof, if proof were wanted, that this person was a woman.

Thanks Patrick

5 comments:

roger said...

"New Light on the Amarna Period", Hoffmeier and Van Djik - excavations at Tell el-Borg in nortern S"

Oh please much much more:

Not least,


'Military'

'Neferneferuaten Akhet-en-Hys ( = useful to her husband), a title unearthed some time ago by Marc Gabolde, and proof, if proof were wanted, that this person was a woman.’

Marianne Luban said...

That is not exactly new about Ankheperure Neferneferuaten and her epithet. Some time ago this was seen on the golden canopic coffinettes of Tutankhamun, original to a woman. But who was the woman? The most likely candidate is Meritaten--but who knows...

Patrick said...

Marc Gabolde, in 'D'Akhenaton à Toutânkhamon' (Paris 1998)establishes quite convincingly that Ankh(et)-Kheperure... Neferneferuaten... is not Smenkhkare, and is a woman. He prefers Meritaten, like you, based in his case largely on the very complex and somewhat sontradictory epigraphical evidence; he rejects Kiya and Nefertiti (N. Reeves, take note). A candidate nobody seems to have considered (never ignore the obvious) is Meritaten's sister Neferneferuaten, probably because she looks so young on the reliefs. But this youthful appearance could well have been an artistic convention; after all,Amenhotep III was thus 'rejuvenated' after his first Jubilee.
In the end, we may probably know who the lady was, or who she reigned with, if anybody,or when. But madcap hypotheses don't help.

Marianne Luban said...

Allen's paper, "The Amarna Succession" is interesting, as well, even though I highly object to his translation of the term "mry" as "desired" instead of the traditional "beloved".

http://cassian.memphis.edu/history/murnane/Allen.pdf

Patrick said...

Oops! That sentence should read: "We may probably NEVER know..."

Search

Admin Control Panel