Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Mostafa Amin, the Secretary General of the SCA, has announced the discovery of a 4th Century Coptic Settlement near Dakhla oasis. 

Mostafa Amin, the Secretary General of the SCA, made the announcement, explaining that the newly discovered settlement consists of remains of residential houses and service buildings as well as a large Basilica with distinguished columns and a wooden alter adorned with foliage decoration and icons showing Jesus, the Virgin Mary, angels and saints.
More details and photos on Ahram Online

Edition 3 of Egyptological which will will be publishing next week on 7th December has an article introducing the history and religion of the Egyptian Copts.  If this sort of subject interests you, then look out for it.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Wednesday, November 30, 2011

I am catching up on a few things and found  really nice little article about the face of Tutankhamun by Marianne Luban.  Marianne starts:

I have written it here and elsewhere that the best way to know how a king of Egypt really looked is to see his face as substituted for those of his servants and nobles
Marianne goes on to suggest that a statue of Paramessu is a good "substitution portrait" for the face of Tutankhamun.  Follow the link for details and a picture.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Wednesday, November 30, 2011

While news is thin, here is a link to some photos of the relefs in Theban tomb TT55 (Ramose).

http://www.flickr.com/photos/paulbeckers/6413802417/in/photostream/

You need to navigate backwards and forwards, and that is a full photostream so not all of the images are from TT55.  Sorry not to post the image directly, but it is copyright.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Wednesday, November 30, 2011

For those who like links I found a new blog at http://magic-pharaohs.blogspot.com. The latest article is about the temple of Abydos and they all seem relatively shallow. It's in Spanish I think (or maybe Italian) - a language for which I can usually gist a translation but no more.  It is not a site  to rush to, but non-English sites aren't as common as they could be so it will be welcomed by some.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Ahram reports that security at archaeological sites has been "doubled" during the elections. No more details but for security one would expect that.

If uncontaminated by hyperbole it is reassuring news.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Monday, November 14, 2011

If you are interested
http://english.ahram.org.eg/~/NewsContent/9/40/26444/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/New-protests-against-the-head-of-Egypts-Supreme-Co.aspx

The demands are familiar and the numbers reportedly small.

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Saturday, November 12, 2011

Apparently (so this article says) some archaeologists associate Punnata with the Land of Punt. If you share that view, then the discovery of a statue associated with Punnata may interest you, although the article doesn't give a date. Pretty marginal interest for most of us I think, but some people might be interested.

http://www.daijiworld.com/news/news_disp.asp?n_id=121305

Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Thursday, November 10, 2011

Some time ago I reviewed Will Cross's book The Life and Secrets of Almina Carnarvon.  I criticised the author for suggesting that the Sixth Earl was illegitimate but refusing the name who he thought was the real father.  The book devoted a lot of attention to Prince Victor Duleep Singh and I had put two and two together, but wasn't entirely sure that four was the answer.

The author and the Daily Mail have now gone public in an article with an amazingly long title, Downton's greatest secret: A lonely countess, an illicit love affair with an Egyptian prince... and an Earl who has no right to his title. The extraordinary claims about real life Lord.Cross also paints a very different picture of Carnarvon than generally appears in the literature:

But Carnarvon contracted a malady from one of the whorehouses, and after returning to England almost died,’ reveals Mr Cross. ‘He retained for life the facial marks from the effects of the disease. Thereafter, Carnarvon was sexually blighted.

His fall-back - with his valet Fernside as his confidant - was taking photographs of women. Naughty pictures became his passion, and at the height of his voyeurism he commissioned 3,000 nudes from a photographic studio.

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