Posted by Kate Phizackerley on Wednesday, January 18, 2012

The University of Basel has issued a couple of brief reports which give us more information.  I have added an addendum to the article on Egyptological which has the links.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

The German report has a clickable photo which gives a clear bigger version of the coffin and stela. There appears to be a bone in the debris on the floor. CJB

Anonymous said...

It seems to be "All quiet in the Land of the Western Ones".... CJB

Kate Phizackerley said...

I don't expect much from the Western Valley for a couple of things. If I am reading the reports correctly, funds for Egyptian excavations in the Valley of the Kings have been reallocated for wages and medical benefits. Certainly money will be tight for a couple of years.

In the long term we may see more excavations in Egypt because the SCA should be better funded when free of the Culture Ministry, so long as the political situation doesn't become negative on archaeology.

Anonymous said...

It is good to hear of medical benefits, so does that increase the opportunities for foreign funded Egyptian excavations do you think? The work at Karnak, which is on a massive scale, has been successfully undertaken for years by a joint Egyptian-French organization. Professor Weeks has also continued in KV5 with a joint team. Perhaps this is the way ahead. Somehow I don't see the current UK government being any help, but one would hope that someone might sponsor such work in The Valley. CJB

Anonymous said...

I hope the new man in charge does allow more Foreign funded missions to excavate in the valley preferably in partnership and paying the wages of Egyptian archaeologists!
Hawass was so keen for an all egyption team to make the next big discovery in the valley.
A big discovery could really kick start tourism into Egypt as it is in the doldrums at the moment!

Anonymous said...

There were some offers in the French media last week for Nile Cruises starting at 200 Euros. I think it included flights. At that price, they really must be experiencing bad times. CJB

Anonymous said...

I have been preparing a talk for a group of UK expats over here in France who interested in Ancient History. I am including KV64 in this as it is current news. I did some backgrounf checking to compare it with other 18th Dynasty tombs in The Valley. Quite by chance, I came across a selection of plans of 18th Dynasty queens tombs in the Valley of the Queens. Tombs such as QV7-10 are all shaft plus single chamber resembling the KV tombs such as 63 and 64. There are even more complicated tombs such as QV63 or 69 which resemble KV12. I did a search to see if there was any literature on this comparison but found none. Does anyone know if this has been picked up before? Knowing how academics live in "compartments of knowledge" and rarely move outside them, it would be no surprise if this had not been noticed. I live in hope!!! CJB

Kate Phizackerley said...

A couple of years ago I was offered a fee for an article about the Valley of the Queens. I tuned it down because I didn't think I could easily write a researched article on the Valley of the Queens because the material is hard to find.

However, I don't think your comparison is at all surprising. That was one of the ways that era had of constructing tombs. It's like buying a modern house - on most estates you get a choice of three or four basic designs.

Anonymous said...

My late father, who was a master cabinet maker, had a book of furniture designs.He even had a set of measuring rods for standard pre-Second World War 2 windows. Standardization saves time but if we were ancient tomb robbers, it would make our job so much easier: "it's a type 4 with a bend to the left at the end of the second corridor". Like a safebreaker would recognize safe varieties (well they do in the films!) The hardest part would be locating the entrance.... and if there were markers, then even that is not difficult.
Apart from the tomb of Nefertari, there is little information on the Queens' Valley. It seems to have been excavated in one go early in the 20th Century and then nothing. That suggests it is ripe for re-examination, if only with a ground radar survey. CJB

Search

Admin Control Panel